Braised Kale, Butternut squash and coconut curry.

The Autoimmune Disease Series

I have another recipe for you today.  It is born from my trying to find interesting, non triggering, nourishing foods.  As such I bring to you: Braised kale, butternut squash and coconut curry.

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This recipe is a winner in so many ways:

  • It contains the super food turmeric, which itself contains curcumin, a potent antioxidant that gives turmeric its rich golden colour.  Turmeric is exploding in popularity in health circles as it is being credited with many cures.  It is helping people to lower pain and inflammation, fight cancer, relieve liver and gallbladder issues, heal the gut and delay the onset of diabetes.  Some have even gone so far as to say that it may have been the gold that was given to Jesus!  If you are suffering from an autoimmune or chronic disease eat this daily, or take a supplement.
  • This recipe  contains the healing trio of fat, turmeric and black pepper.  Being fat soluble, you will increase your absorption of the health boosting curcumin (in the turmeric) by cooking it with fat.  The fat will help the curcumin navigate the stomach to the small intestines and then the blood where you will gain the most benefit from it’s miraculous properties.  Taking curcumin with black pepper will increase its bio availability by 1,000 times.  So get grinding.
  • It contains the super food kale which is rammed with antioxidants.  As a green leafy vegetable it also plays host to lots of relaxing magnesium, which will help with tension and muscle aches along with promoting heart health and bone health.  Kale has beta carotene in abundance which among other benefits is known to promote a health lining of the urinary tracts, boosting urinary health.
  • Butternut squash increases the phytonutrient  whammy and something else that I haven’t mentioned yet is the significant amount of fibre, that will aid digestion, promote bile release and enhance good gut flora.
  • I use coconut oil to fry with as it has a high smoke point, avoiding the toxicity produced by damaged heated oils.  Coconut has loads of benefits too; anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral.  It also contains a unique blend of medium chain fatty acids which can be really easily absorbed into your cells.  This can make coconut oil a really useful product for diabetics.
  • I have made a recipe that leaves out the nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes, chili powders, aubergines and peppers), which appear to aggravate symptoms of autoimmune disease particularly inflammation of joints.  It is also grain free and vegan.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1 butternut squash, peeled and sliced into ½-inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger or 1/2 teaspoon dried
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander seed
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin seed
  • 5 garlic cloves, sliced or crushed
  • 1 can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 squeeze lemon or lime juice
  • A sprinkling of pumpkin seeds
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the coconut oil in a large pan over a medium heat.
  2. Add onion and squash with ginger, turmeric, mustard seeds, coriander and cumin.
  3. Fry gently, stirring frequently, until the onion has softened, about 10 minutes.  If the spices start to burn add a little water to the pan and keep stirring.
  4. Add the kale and garlic, stir for a minute or two and then add the coconut milk, cover and cook, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes.
  5. Serve into bowls.
  6. Add a good grind of black pepper, sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and zing it up with freshly squeezed lemon juice.

There are more ingredients in this than I would like.  I am trying to keep things simple for you.  Many of you, I know, will struggle to look at the page, let alone spend ages chopping and stirring.  I hope that my throw together method will ease things a bit.  By all means half the recipe if you wish, to cut down on chopping time (those butternut squashes can take their toll).  That said I wouldn’t recommend buying pre-chopped butternut squash, or anything else for that matter – I am trying to nourish and sustain you and the pre-packs will leave you with far less nutrients, let alone toxic compounds from anything that may have leached from the plastic packaging.

But that is a conversation for another day.

 

Gemma x

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